Women’s Rights Emerges within the Antislavery Movement, 1830–1870: A Brief History with Documents cover image

Women’s Rights Emerges within the Antislavery Movement, 1830–1870: A Brief History with Documents

By Kathryn Kish Sklar (auth.)
pdf
Format
2000
Year
English
Language
Palgrave Macmillan US
Publisher

Summary

<p>Combining documents with an interpretive essay, this book is the first to offer a much-needed guide to the emergence of the women's rights movement within the anti-slavery activism of the 1830s. A 60-page introductory essay traces the cause of women's rights from Angelina and Sarah Grimké's campaign against slavery through the development of a full-fledged women's rights movement in the 1840s and 1850s. A rich collection of over 50 documents includes diary entries, letters, and speeches from the Grimkés, Maria Stewart, Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Theodore Weld, Frances Harper, Sojourner Truth, and others.</p>

Related books


Others
Abolition: A History of Slavery and Antislavery
Seymour Drescher
Others
Natural Law and the Antislavery Constitutional Tradition
Justin Buckley Dyer
Others
American Antislavery Writings: Colonial Beginnings to Emancipation
James G. Basker (Ed.)
Others
The Debate Over Slavery: Antislavery and Proslavery Liberalism in Antebellum America
David F. Ericson
Politics
Free Hearts and Free Homes: Gender and American Antislavery Politics
Michael D. Pierson
Others
Women’s Rights Emerges within the Antislavery Movement, 1830–1870: A Brief History with Documents
Kathryn Kish Sklar (auth.)